Posts Tagged ‘poll’

Harper? The worst PM since 1968?

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

Shurely, the respondents to the poll must have interpreted this as a rhetorical question!

I mean, who even comes close???

And forget about “since 1968”. How about “ever”???

The biggest change observed since 2011 is in the second question. One-in-four Canadians (26%, +7) think Harper has been Canada’s Worst Prime Minister since 1968. Mulroney is a distant second with 17 per cent, followed by Trudeau (11%) and Chrétien (9%).

Harper is judged to be the worst recent head of government by more than a third of Atlantic Canadians (40%) and Quebecers (36%), as well as 26 per cent of British Columbians. Trudeau fares poorly in Alberta (21%), and Mulroney has a negative showing in Atlantic Canada, British Columbia and Ontario.

“Is Harper the worst PM ever” falls in the same category as the following rhetorical questions:

  • What’s another word for Thesaurus?
  • Why do they call them apartments when they are all stuck together?
  • Why are there flotation devices under plane seats, instead of parachutes?
  • Why do hot dogs come ten to a package and hot dog buns only eight?
  • Why do they put Braille dots on the keypad of the drive-up ATM?
  • Why do flammable and inflammable mean the same thing?
  • Why do we drive on parkways and park on driveways?
  • If you see a heat wave, should you wave back?
  • Why do fat chance and slim chance mean the same thing?
  • Why is brassiere singular and panties plural?

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So, how bad might it be for the Grits?

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

If you are a Liberal and you’re watching the results roll in on the night of May 2, it might be very, very bad.

Or not.

Or just a little bad.

But if you are a non-partisan progressive, it may be good.

Or very, very good.

Or just OK.

Much of how this game of thrones plays out hinges on turnout – especially in Ontario, where the Liberal vote has more or less done a deep six, but the Dippers have yet to pick up the slack. Québec is also a wildcard. Are the former Bloc supporters really giving up on Duceppe? Québec voters have proven to be volatile in the past – and they may once more prove themselves so.

I’m not at all going to get into WHY this happened; that can wait until later. But the polls are consistently showing that there has been a steady shift to the Blue team and the Orange side. And if the Dipper support in Ontario, which is currently stagnant, takes an upswing like elsewhere in Canada, the Grits had better stock up on some good scotch on May 2 and for the next 4 years… cuz there be bad times comin’ .

It will be interesting to see the Nanos poll tomorrow morning.

 

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The power of the institutions of democracy

Thursday, February 25th, 2010

I thought I’d share few thoughts about the latest polling results released yesterday by Nanos Research – a firm that I consider to be second to none in Canadian political public opinion research.

Respondents were read a list of the “institutions of democracy” and asked to rate the degree of power that each of them had. The results were not all that surprising with the PMO being rated as the institution pointed to having too much power.

Not surprising because I am quite certain that respondents were hearing “PM” instead of the PMO as a whole.

But what I did find surprising were the choices that were read to the respondents:

The PMO, The House of Commons, The Federal Cabinet, The Senate, The Supreme Court, The Federal Civil Service

Institutions two through four are undoubtedly institutions of our Canadian democracy. Their existence is enshrined in the Constitution. Canadians know them and trust them to be the prime decision makers at the federal level.

But the PMO and the Public Service?I don’t really consider them to be “institutions of our democracy”. They are very important components of it – but not institutions in the Constitutional sense.

I wonder why Nanos included them? I can only suspect that the reason for doing so was to gauge the feeling about the relative power of the PMO and the PS to the HoC, Supreme Court, etc. It is true that there has been a lot of (justifiable) media attention about the amount of power that is wielded by the PMO. And in the past there have been questions about how much power should be granted to the PS.

In any case, the results are interesting and pretty much confirm what Canadians have thought about Harper and his autocratic rule – too much power for Harpy and not enough in the House. And Cauncks are pretty sure of themselves as only 8.7% of respondents indicated that they were unsure about the appropriateness of the degree of power used by the PMO – the lowest rate of “unsureness”  among all of the listed institutions.

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