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catholic school board

The Ontario Catholic School Board supporters had an email campaign, I guess…

Update- so here’s some proof of an organised campaign.

So. There is this website that the Ontario Liberals have set up called “Common Ground” that is designed to elicit comments from Ontarians on new policy directions. This is not a bad idea. But good ideas can be hijacked by special interests who would clearly be positively or negatively affected by a certain proposed policy. Such is the case with the idea called Merging the Public and Catholic School Boards.

Anyone who has passed through this blog in the past may have wandered by a post(s) where I have derided Ontario’s two Board system as discriminatory and wasteful.  So, I checked this idea about a week ago after hearing it mentioned on CBC Radio one morning. Happily, and not unexpectedly, the positive response (you get to vote for an idea either positively or negatively) was through the roof. This idea had one of the biggest positive uptakes only a week ago and now look at what’s happened.

I’d LOVE it if someone went public with the email that surely went out to Catholic Boards, the teachers and the unions urging members to go on-line and vote against this idea whose time has come. But no matter, this government has been clear that it has no interest in changing Ontario’s wasteful and discriminatory dual board system.



More and more…

… I’m thinking about getting involved with the Green Party of Ontario.

They are the only Ontario political party who has taken a rational stance on our wasteful and discriminatory duplicate system of education.

Party leader Mike Schreiner wants a public commission to study the best way of amalgamating the separate and public systems into one French and English organization.

Schreiner was in Waterloo Region Wednesday supporting Kitchener-Waterloo Green party candidate Stacey Danckert. The pair spoke to the media from Danckert’s backyard.

Ontario is the only province that funds one religious school system at the exclusion of all others and it needs to stop, Schreiner said.

“Is it fair that public dollars go to an organization that excludes two-thirds of the eligible teachers of being hired based on religion?” he said. “Where else in our society would we allow that?”

Instead, all three “old” parties at Queen’s Park refuse to talk about the contentious issue and choose to “slam the door on even having a conversation about this.”

I like the cut of this guy’s jib… gonna have to look a bit more carefully at their other policies. But, if you have ever been here before, you will know that this is a big issue for me.





A follow up to my post on the school kids in Morinville, Alberta

A while back, I wrote this piece about non-Catholic kids in this small Alberta community being forced to attend a Catholic school.

The Alberta Education Minister, Dave Hancock, seems to agree that a way must be found to provide a secular education to families on the area.

They have a legitimate beef, says Hancock. “I think that they’re entitled to a public education that doesn’t include religion,” he said in an interview.

The columnist goes even further and notes:

Frankly, I think the denominational school system should be relegated to the dustbin of history. Alberta, Saskatchewan and Ontario are the only provinces that still maintain publicly funded separate schools. Quebec got rid of the denominational system years ago with very little fuss.

Newfoundland replaced its church-run schools with a public system about a decade ago after a referendum. The world didn’t fall apart there, either.

Catholics, Muslims, Jews, Hindus and any other religious group has the right to educate their children in a faith-based system if they choose – but it should not be on the public’s dime.

In the meantime, it is encouraging that the Alberta government is on its way to correcting this injustice.