One progressive party under one banner?

“Nope,” I said. “They’re too goddamn stupid.”

That’s what Warren Kinsella told Bobby Kennedy Jr. when asked if the NDP and Liberals could ever be persuaded to work together.

And he was right.

As long as the progressive vote is split between the two parties in this fine country, Harpo hasn’t a worry in the world! He has his 25-30 point base and can cobble together enough from the fringes to win majority after majority. The 25-30 percent don’t care about robocalls, prorogation, and the politics of fear. They love the Robot leader and nuthin’ gonna change that, boy!

And, unless smart leaders – those who can do basic math, that is – like Nathan Cullen or perhaps Justin Trudeau are elected as leaders, we’ll see Harper blue for some time to come. So, unless the improbable happens and Cullen is elected the new Dipper boss tomorrow, who leads Layton’s party is irrelevant.

Period.

I’m a Liberal, but not an “engaged” one… I’m the kind that frustrates riding organisations to no end. I pay my membership fee and vote for the local candidate. But I don’t donate to the party, nor do I volunteer at election time. Show me that you can do Grade 3 math and I’ll be there. With a smile and my chequebook.

And you’ll have lots of blue team progressives coming into the tent too. The old school PCs don’t have a home. Give them one.

Is anyone listening?

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9 Comments to “One progressive party under one banner?”

  1. Chris says:

    Oh Lordie — Justin Trudeau? Please no. The man is an idiot and poser. He would secretly love to be Ben Mulroney, but somehow feels obligated to exploit the Trudeau name doing “political stuff”. I wish people would stop encouraging him. And I don’t think a united left is any sort of answer either. The Liberals won elections handily for decades without having to marry the NDP. What is needed is leadership. Somebody needs to find a leader with charisma and public appeal — that’s what’s going to win votes, not intelligence or vision or political savvy or experience.

  2. Liam Young says:

    Nice dream … real nightmare.

    I’ve suggested it too many times and have had my head bit off by party leaders and wonks that could care less about Canadian democracy.

    Example: the NDP claims it’s about proportional representation. Where’s the private members bill or work with the other parties to make this happen?

  3. Skinny Dipper says:

    I do think that if the NDP picks a good leader, it will be able to challenge the Conservative Party.

    I generally find people supporting a pre-election coalition or cooperation between the NDP and Liberals tend to be Liberal supporters. Call me “cynical.” I think that Liberal supporters are upset that the Liberal Party came in 3rd place in the last federal election. Had the party come in second, there would be little discussion about centre-left cooperation. I think some Liberals want a cooperation agreement in order to weaken the NDP–not to strengthen progressives.

    • trashee says:

      I do agree that there are some Grits who would see the weakening of the NDP as the goal of a coalition.

      But as someone who is most definitely centre-left, I see the bigger picture as doing whatever it takes to defeat the Cons.

      And I really don’t believe that the Liberals nor the NDP can do this on their own.

    • I think that if the Lib and NDP ran an election on a coalition platform, we’d end up with a Con majority. People like to talk a good Lefty game, but when push comes to shove, they never want to pay the Lefty price.

      I think both the Liberals and NDP know this too, that’s why they’ve never done it.

  4. I don’t think Justin Trudeau is the guy. He might win an election based on his name, like our wonderful premiere, but I suspect that just under the skin he’s an anti-english, make-canada-all-french, kow-tow-to-quebec-at-everyone-elses-expense douchebag like his father. Not to say that everything PET did was bad, but there were many WTF?? decisions in his reign.

    Canada doesn’t need that. It needs a leader with a national vision that looks forward instead of a regional vision that looks to the next election.

    I have seen no evidence that such a leader exists in the current crop.

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